There is a new tenant in the shark pool. Variola that were seen floating on the water in the area of the coral reserve were collected by the Reserve staff and transferred for further treatment at the Underwater Observatory Marine Park.

Treatment by the Park’s team of divers included puncturing the swim bladder to release air, and immediately transferring it into a dark environment. A few days later, when the Variola’s condition seemed to improve, it was transferred to the shark pool.
The sharks are fine!

A new inhabitant was recently discovered during a study carried out on creatures in the depth of the sea: a sand crab that lives at a depth of 200 – 600 meters.

The crab lives in complete darkness and for that reason its vision is not good. The sand crab feeds on remains of food, decomposition and small creatures that live in the sand.
The new inhabitant can be seen in the Underwater Observatory Park

Body of adult jellyfish consists of a bell-shaped body made ​​of “jelly” that envelops an internal structure that branches out from it. Medusas body contains 97% water.

They have no vertebrae, bones, heart, brain, eyes, blood, fins and gills.
Along the coast of Israel and the jellyfish are not fatal and serious injury and often accompanied by burning and redness of the skin.

The Flower-Horn species of fish is not a natural fish species. They are the hybrid result of cross-breeding a variety of American cichlids.
These fish are popular in the south of Asia and, recently, have become popular in other parts of the world. The main reason for the excitement and enthusiasm regarding this fish is the Chinese belief that whomever owns the Flower-Horn fish will have prosperity in their business, good health and a long life.
The fish has a prominent protrusion on its head, and it is said that in its shape it is reminiscent of the god that is responsible for long life; there are those who claim that the protrusion is reminiscent of the heads of the famous warriors of the “Shaolin” temple in China.

Slugs – nudibranch – are snails without a shell. More accurately, they are creatures that have a small and atrophied internal shell. The body of the slug is soft and contains a lot of water.
The sea slugs have developed a variety of wonderful and diverse shapes that serve them for warnings, camouflage and courtship.
The slugs store venom in their bodies which they use for self-protection.
Their bright colors are intended to serve as a warning sign for predators. There are about 3,000 types of slugs. The largest – the ‘Spanish Dancer’ – can grow up to 45 cm. It is possible to see the Spanish Dancer and other types of slugs on display in the Rare Fish Aquarium (No. 9 on the map).

During a routine patrol by the diving team of the Underwater Observatory Marine Park, they found a turtle that had been wounded in the neck. The turtle was immediately transferred to a separate recovery pool and the team started initial treatment. The turtle received treatment with antibiotics and was kept for further treatment and observation until it was completely recovered, when it was returned to the Turtle Pool.

We recently completed a study of sea creatures in the depths of the sea and discovered strange and unusual creatures we had never seen before. Two of these tenants came to visit us.
The first is a special starfish that lives at depths of 500 meters and feeds on scraps of food and decay which it finds on the seabed. Its colors are vibrant and its shape is unique.

There is a new tenant in the shark pool. Variola that were seen floating on the water in the area of the coral reserve were collected by the Reserve staff and transferred for further treatment at the Underwater Observatory Marine Park. Treatment by the Park’s team of divers included puncturing the swim bladder to release air, and immediately transferring it into a dark environment. A few days later, when the variola’s condition seemed to improve, it was transferred to the shark pool.
The sharks are fine!

During December the diving team of the Underwater Observatory Park released dozens of young squid about 6 weeks old, all born in the Underwater Observatory Park, into the open sea.

After the eggs had been laid and hatched, the baby squid remained in the area of the nest and studied the environment. After a month and a half they left the nest and sought new territory for themselves, and learned how to fend for themselves. The Park, therefore, decided it was time to release the squid into the open sea so they could help revitalize the squid population in the Gulf.

A severely wounded Moray eel, which was in danger of dying, was observed during a routine dive.

The Moray eel was gathered up by a team of divers from the Underwater Observatory Marine Park in Eilat and quickly taken to the Park for treatment.
Our dedicated team of divers devotedly treated the Moray eel and after two days of recovery – to everyone’s surprise – it began to eat, despite the fact that its eyes had been injured and its vision impaired. The Moray eel managed to eat using only its sense of smell .
It had also suffered a torn jaw; the tear having apparently been caused by a fish hook .
After intensive treatment the Moray eel’s vision was restored to both eyes and it is able to eat quite normally. However, its ability to swim is still off-balance .
The diving team will continue to treat the Moray eel until it is fully recovered, so that in the near future, after rehabilitation ( we hope ) it will be able to return to its natural home in the Gulf of Eilat.